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Tracking: { 'Country Code': 'US', 'Language Code': 'EN-US', 'Email Hash': 'unknown', 'Vendor User Id': 'unknown', 'Vendor Id': 'unknown', 'Customer Type': '', 'Offer Code FONT Download

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            'Offer Code downloadDesigner: Frederic W. Goudy,
Publisher: Caron twice
Imagine America in the 1930s. A gangster flick with Al Capone, a crime novel featuring Philip Marlowe. Our hero in a fedora sits in a classy bar, orders a double bourbon, lights a cigar and eyes the evening paper. He turns the pages, reading about a bank heist over on Third Avenue, a scandal involving a baseball player, a small ad for a general practitioner and a large spread about a famous law firm. What do the bottle of booze and the majestic facade of the bank have in common? The elegant baseball uniform and trustworthy attorneys? - Copperplate Gothic -

When Frederick William Goudy created his legendary typeface in 1901, it went on to literally become the symbol of early 20th century America. Tiny serifs, characteristically broad letterforms, and particularly bold titles decorated calling cards at 6-point size, enormous bronze-cast logos, newspaper headlines, restaurant menus and more. This was the golden age of Copperplate, lasting up until the arrival of die neue Typografie and monospaced grotesques in the 1960s.

Then the typeface almost completely disappeared. It made a partial comeback with the advent of the personal computer; digitizations of varying quality appeared, and one version even became a standard font in Adobe programs. This may have played a role in Copperplate later being used in DIY projects and amateur designs, which harmed its reputation.

Copperplate New has been created to revive the faded glory of the original design. Formally, the new typeface expands the existing weight and proportional extremes. The slight serifs are reduced even further, making the typeface sans-like at smaller point sizes and improving readability. In contrast, at large point sizes it retains all of its original character. Decorative inline & shadow styles have been added and both have been created in all five proportions, making it easy to adapt the typesetting to the format you need. Despite these changes and innovations, Copperplate New remains true to Goudy's original design and represents a snazzy way to evoke a golden era in American culture.

Copperplate New specimen: http://carontwice.com/files/Copperplate_New_specimen_Carontwice.pdf


1900s american bakery bank baseball beer branding bussiness caps only card champagne chcolate cocktail coffee cognac condensed constitution copperplate decorative display dream elegant engraving exclusive extended finance financial golden age goudy illuminated industrial inline innovation inventor label law logo manufacturing menu metallic money national nikolatesla package packing present print prosper restaurant shadow sign painting small caps small sizes tiny serif uppercase vintage whiskey wine
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